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Don’t get me wrong, I don’t agree with this statement. In fact, I couldn’t be more opposed to it. With all of the media options available to children, young adults and adults, we need to make reading more convenient, not less. Books and eBooks are competing against social media, online and console gaming, video streaming, video downloading and YouTube, podcasting, radio, television and more.

Time, of course, is limited. Reading and books have to compete for people’s time. So who wants to make reading inconvenient? Maja Thomas, a senior VP at Hachette (USA I assume). In a New York Times article published on Christmas Day entitled “Publishers vs. Libraries: An E-Book Tug of War”, the idea of public libraries lending eBooks to its patrons seems to be totally against (some) publishers’ policies.

Borrowing a printed book from the library imposes an inconvenience upon its patrons. “You have to walk or drive to the library, then walk or drive back to return it,” says Maja Thomas, a senior vice president of the Hachettte Book Group, in charge of its digital division.

To keep their overall revenue from taking a hit from lost sales to individuals, publishers need to reintroduce more inconvenience for the borrower or raise the price for the library purchaser.

To me, this misses the point entirely. In fact, it’s one of the most ridiculous things I’ve read in a while. If reading is too inconvenient, people will select another, more convenient entertainment option. And what will publishers do then? And where does this leave school libraries?

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