Library to do list 2012

So I returned to work yesterday and very pleased to be back. I have a lot of things on my to do list this year and now I’m 0.4, I’ve got more of a chance of achieving them. So here goes:

Ereader survey for school website
Diigo for subjects, link to wiki
Pininterest for new books and topics?
Twitter/fb?
Book blog using posterous? Add book trailers. Use that URL for QR code new books there too
Podcasts for wiki
EBooks 
QR codes for fiction
Add list of useful apps to wiki
Douchey’s podcasts for wiki biology page
Readers Cup. Do at years 7-8 and 9-10
Link blogs to Twitter using Twitterfeed
Investigate Overdrive with a visit to Jenny Luca’s school

This is above and beyond what will be required of me in terms of providing professional learning for staff. The good news is that the Heads of Library and English support the idea of the Readers Cup wholeheartedly; the Principal agreed to a library Twitter account and I’ve started that as well as a book and reading blog and Diigo account. I’ve linked the blogs to Twitterfeed and Diigo via Packratius. I’m pleased with my progress considering we had meetings until 2.30pm yesterday and I don’t return to work until Monday.

I’m also really pleased how supportive the admin are and most teachers seemed genuinely pleased to be back. I’m looking forward to what else might appear on my radar in 2012. I wonder what it might be? What’s on your 2012 to do list?

Making reading inconvenient

Don’t get me wrong, I don’t agree with this statement. In fact, I couldn’t be more opposed to it. With all of the media options available to children, young adults and adults, we need to make reading more convenient, not less. Books and eBooks are competing against social media, online and console gaming, video streaming, video downloading and YouTube, podcasting, radio, television and more.

Time, of course, is limited. Reading and books have to compete for people’s time. So who wants to make reading inconvenient? Maja Thomas, a senior VP at Hachette (USA I assume). In a New York Times article published on Christmas Day entitled “Publishers vs. Libraries: An E-Book Tug of War”, the idea of public libraries lending eBooks to its patrons seems to be totally against (some) publishers’ policies.

Borrowing a printed book from the library imposes an inconvenience upon its patrons. “You have to walk or drive to the library, then walk or drive back to return it,” says Maja Thomas, a senior vice president of the Hachettte Book Group, in charge of its digital division.

To keep their overall revenue from taking a hit from lost sales to individuals, publishers need to reintroduce more inconvenience for the borrower or raise the price for the library purchaser.

To me, this misses the point entirely. In fact, it’s one of the most ridiculous things I’ve read in a while. If reading is too inconvenient, people will select another, more convenient entertainment option. And what will publishers do then? And where does this leave school libraries?