The digital divide

This morning when I was researching Pokemon Go, it was amazing to see that there have been approximately 47,000,000 news articles written about the online phenomenon in the last eleven days, since its limited release (initially in the United States, New Zealand and Australia on July 6 and from July 14 in the United Kingdom and Germany. Probably more countries have been added while I write this). What was even more incredible is that about 500,000 articles were added in the twenty minutes between the time I first searched for Pokemon Go and getting around to beginning this post.

Initially, the term ‘digital divide‘ was used to describe those who had access to ICT and those who did not. However, in the last few days I’m hearing much more about the people who are connected with ICT, mainly for work purposes, and their stunned reaction to the millions of people who are seemingly addicted to hunting and catching all those cute little Pokemons. Stories abound from people hiring Uber drivers to chauffeur them around to Pokemon hotspots, to paying someone else to chase Pokemons for them. I’m thinking that there’s a new digital divide happening before our eyes and morphing every day; those who play Pokemon Go and those who don’t. People who understand the phenomenon are cashing in on the sensation, driving foot traffic to retail stores, using it as a real estate selling point and theme parks holding events specifically for the initiated.

But what does this all mean for my interest groups, schools and libraries? It seems like a number of libraries have been quick to react, which is not surprising, knowing how connected libraries are to technology and user experiences these days. The State Library of New South Wales has a one-stop page for everything you need to know about the game, while the Boroondara Libraries in Melbourne have information on the whereabouts of some of the elusive little creatures. The School Library Journal has a great page with everything an information professional needs to know.

However, I’m still not sure how schools will react to this sensation, apart from banning adult gamers from accessing school grounds during school hours. I would love to hear in the comments how anyone plans to use the game in schools and how they might sell it to those in power who don’t play. Will the digital divide in your school disadvantage your students? This conversation between Joachim Cohen and Jared Wilkins gives an example as to how Pokemon Go, or the concepts behind it, might be used in schools.

Cool tools for the connected classroom

Australian award winning teacher and all round edtech guru Anne Mirtschin has written a must have guide for teachers: Cool tools for the connected classroom.

Anne guides teachers and students from how and why these tools are used, suggesting activities right through to a number of assessments. Cybersafety and good digital citizenship are often referred to with some excellent guidelines for students to consider and discuss.

With lots of suggestions for tools for:
Connecting
Communicating
Creating
there is excellent support for using these tools for learning and teaching and how teahcers might go about introducing them to students.

Anne Mirtschin is an experienced and passionate educator who knows her stuff. Cool tools for the connected classroom is an ideal companion for those wanting to push the virtual boundaries in their classroom and school and is equally useful for those new to social media and those who have more experience and confidence. Written in an engaging and accessible style, lesson plans, activity sheets and exemplars will assist teachers in successfully implementing social media in their classrooms. An attractive and thoughtful layout adds to the accessibility of the resource.

It’s nice to see an Australian author and an Australian publisher produce a guide that is relevant to teachers globally.

Cool tools for the connected classroom by Anne Mirtschin is priced at $38.95 and the ISBN No. is 978 1 74200 498 3 and is available from Education Serviced Australia, PO Box 177, Carlton South, 3053. Ph: 61 3 9207 9600. Email: sales@esa.edu.au  Website: www.curriculumpress.edu.au